• A reputation for professional excellence with integrity

    A reputation for professional excellence with integrity

  • Accurate understanding and technical analysis

    Accurate understanding and technical analysis

  • National and International Experience

    National and International Experience

  • 34 years in private legal practice

    34 years in private legal practice

  • A focus on events and consequences, not gossip

    A focus on events and consequences, not gossip

  • Helping lawyers, brokers, accountants, surveyors and other professions

    Helping lawyers, brokers, accountants, surveyors and other professions

  • There when you need him

    There when you need him

Telling Tales January 2018

18 Jan 18

Fear … or sloth?

A good resolution for the New Year will be to be more candid when addressing reasons for any mistake, especially those resulting from omissions rather than faux pas.  Whilst those who rush in may be foolish, more damage results, more often, from stuff left undone. Sometimes inactions are genuinely compelled by circumstances, affording solid defences; but often the root causes are just oversights or derelictions.

There is a hierarchy of excuses, dressed as explanations, available to those who face accountability. Obedience to higher authority tops the list, followed by risk or danger, aka fear, for self, colleagues or enterprise, because they tap the empathies of bosses or commentators. Time and monetary pressures are commonest. The explanation most rarely volunteered, and which investigators are frequently reluctant to explore, is simple indolence, because it is both the one most easily condemned and yet most readily recognised by supervisors and judges within themselves. Findings of dereliction tend to be prefaced by a superlative ‘gross’ or ‘unacceptable’. Yet professionals are expected to be conscientious and are measured against standards which are often unrealistically demanding. They have to be, because otherwise even the laziest can hope to be rescued by their interrogators’ preference to accept their excuses and ascribe their error to causes more dignified to all concerned than “couldn’t be bothered”.

Fearfulness and indolence are respectively very different human characteristics, emanating physically from different parts of the brain; and when identified, the lessons and indicators should likewise require very different responses. It’s often a mistake to confuse them.

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Professional Risk Expertise

Mike Willis has worked with a diverse range of professions including...

The FMWL Approach …

  • Accurate understanding and technical analysis;
  • Focus on duty, causal event(s) and consequences; not gossip…
  • Sensitive but objective empathy;
  • Overarching commerciality; and
  • Clear aims, with vision where necessary to explore indirect routes to solutions.